CBD Examine analyzed the prices of 856 CBD oils from 263 companies to answer the question, “Are you paying too much for CBD?”

CBD products come in different sizes and potencies, making it difficult for consumers to spot overpriced products. The retail price alone isn’t enough to tell you if you’re getting a good deal. A $20 product with 100 milligrams of CBD is not a better deal than a $30 product with 1,000 milligrams of CBD. The $30 bottle has a higher retail price, but has 10x the CBD, so the cost per milligram of CBD (how much you’re paying for every CBD milligram) is far less. We’re guessing you want more CBD for your buck. (So do we.) So you can’t just rely on the retail price or even the size of the bottle. You need to look at the cost per milligram of CBD to understand the value you’re getting.

Prices are even harder to understand when companies don’t list the total milligrams of CBD on their labels. Many products mislead consumers by displaying numbers on their labels for substances other than CBD, such as “hemp extract” or “total cannabinoids” which often have larger quantities of milligrams and make you think you’re getting more CBD.

So how much does CBD cost? And what is a good deal? Ask Google and you’ll get thousands of answers, all of them different. Here at CBD Examine we want to take the guesswork out of this question for you. We’ve analyzed the cost per milligram of CBD for over 800 CBD products to help you know the true cost of CBD.

Key Findings

  • The average cost per milligram of CBD in 2020 is $0.099 (about 10 cents).
    • Full-spectrum products (products with CBD, THC, and other cannabinoids) are the most expensive, with an average CBD cost per milligram of $0.104.
    • Broad-spectrum products (products with CBD, other cannabinoids, and NO THC) have an average CBD cost per milligram of $0.097.
    • Pure CBD products (CBD isolate, NO THC, and NO other cannabinoids) are cheaper, averaging $0.075 per milligram of CBD.
  • The average cost of CBD dropped 37.5% in the last year, from 16 cents per milligram in 2019 to 10 cents per milligram in 2020. Prices for 2019 are derived from CBD Examine’s 2019 CBD Oil Industry Report.
  • The cost per milligram of CBD is determined by dividing the retail price of a CBD product by the total milligrams of CBD in the product (e.g. $100 bottle with 1,000mg CBD is 10 cents per milligram, $100/1000mg = $0.10). Use this formula to find the true cost of CBD.
  • Prescription CBD is 14 cents per milligram, according to the price of a 100 mL supply (containing 10,000mg of CBD for $1377) found on drugs.com. The average consumer product is 10 cents per milligram of CBD.
  • Some CBD products with low retail prices are outrageously expensive when you look at the cost per milligram of CBD. For example, we found a $20 CBD product with 25mg of CBD that cost a whopping 80 cents per milligram of CBD. The CBD product may seem cheap when we look at the retail price, but it is eight times the average cost of CBD per milligram.
  • CBD products with a high retail cost are often a better deal. CBD products under $50 have an average cost per milligram of about 11 cents, products retailing between $50 and $100 dollars are about 10 cents per milligram of CBD, and products with a retail price over $100 average 8.4 cents per milligram of CBD. The average cost of CBD per milligram for products over $100 is over 22% cheaper when compared to products that are under $50.
  • Consumers pay up to 27 times more per milligram of CBD for products in the same price range. The most expensive cost per milligram was 80 cents, which came from a 25mg CBD product that cost $20. In contrast, a $24 tincture with 750mg of CBD was only 3 cents per milligram. Independent lab testing at CBD Examine also confirmed that the 3-cent CBD product contained accurate levels of CBD. The same company makes a 3,000mg formula for $70, which is about 2 cents per milligram of CBD or 40 times cheaper than the most expensive brand in our report. Two cents per milligram is also a fraction of the cost of prescription CBD, which was 14 cents per milligram.
  • Price is only one factor to consider when purchasing CBD. The most expensive brand we analyzed was found to contain “dangerous synthetic marijuana,” according to research published by Consumer Reports in 2018. In contrast, some of the cheapest CBD products we’ve lab tested at CBD Examine have contained little-to-no CBD. The reliability and quality of a CBD company are far more important than the retail price tag of a CBD product.

Warning: This is an analysis of prices and claims by CBD manufacturers. CBD investigations by researchers and news organizations have found that CBD products often do NOT contain the amount of CBD claimed by the manufacturer. In some cases, CBD products are entirely fake. Read our 2019 CBD Oil Industry Report for more info. CBD Examine sends every product that we review to two independent labs for blind testing. However, we have not tested every company on this price analysis. This list is only for CBD price comparisons based on the amount of CBD claimed by the manufacturer, and some manufacturers make false claims.

See our picks for the best CBD oils based on our independent lab tests.


How Much Does CBD Cost?

We analyzed a total of 263 companies and 856 CBD products. The average cost was 10 cents per milligram of CBD, the minimum cost was about 1 cent per milligram, and the maximum cost was 80 cents per milligram. It’s critical to note that these are manufacturer claims and many CBD products do not contain accurate amounts of CBD. The best deal that we confirmed with an independent lab test was 3 cents per milligram and the company also offers the same formula in larger size bottles for 2 cents per milligram.

The cost per milligram of CBD is determined by dividing the retail price of a CBD product by the total milligrams of CBD in the product (e.g. a $100 bottle with 1,000mg is 10 cents per milligram, $100/1,000mg = $0.10).

Image of chart showing the distribution of cost per mg of CBD across all 856 products surveyed.

Most CBD products are between 3 and 14 cents per milligram of CBD. The most common price range is between 6 and 8 cents per milligram of CBD.

There are 13 CBD products under 3 cents per milligram, 146 products between 3 and 6 cents, 266 products between 6 and 8 cents, 194 products between 8 and 11 cents, 106 products between 11 and 14 cents, 60 products between 14 and 17 cents, 29 products between 17 and 19 cents, 15 products between 19 and 22 cents, 6 products between 22 and 25 cents, and 21 products that are over 25 cents per mg of CBD. One product was 80 cents per mg of CBD.


Category Breakdown

The most common type of CBD product is full-spectrum, which refers to products that contain CBD, THC, and multiple cannabinoids. Full-spectrum products may come with something researchers call the “entourage effect,” which suggests that other cannabinoids and nutrients found in the cannabis plant may increase the medicinal benefits of CBD. Broad-spectrum products contain CBD, other cannabinoids, and no THC. However, our lab testing has found that most broad-spectrum products contain very little amounts of other cannabinoids. Pure CBD products (derived from CBD Isolate) contain CBD, no THC, and no other cannabinoids. People choose broad-spectrum or pure CBD products to avoid THC’s side effects, for moral reasons, or to avoid issues with drug testing. THC is the psychoactive component of cannabis and while it comes in low doses in full-spectrum hemp extracts, it may still cause a failed drug test or psychoactive effects in some individuals.

Full-spectrum products are typically the most expensive because it is costly to extract multiple cannabinoids while removing toxins (e.g. lead, pesticides, etc.). Broad-spectrums are typically cheaper than full-spectrums. However, broad-spectrums often contain CBD and little-to-no other cannabinoids. Pure CBD or products derived from CBD isolate are the cheapest.

Image of chart showing the distribution of cost per mg of CBD across just the full spectrum products  (505 products).

The average cost of a full-spectrum hemp product is 10.4 cents per milligram. The majority of full-spectrum products are between 4 cents and 11 cents per milligram of CBD.

167 products are between 4 and 7 cents per milligram. 158 products are between 7 and 11 cents per milligram. The lowest cost is 1.5 cents and the highest cost is 80 cents per milligram.

Image of chart showing the distribution of cost per mg of CBD across just the broad spectrum products  (148 products).

The average cost of a broad-spectrum CBD product is 9.7 cents per milligram. Most broad-spectrum CBD products are between 5 and 10 cents per milligram.

Image of chart showing the distribution of cost per mg of CBD across just the CBD isolate products  (103 products).

The average cost of pure CBD oil (from isolate) is 7.5 cents per milligram of CBD. The majority of pure CBD products are between 3 and 10 cents per milligram of CBD.

16 products were over 10 cents per milligram of CBD.


Retail Price Breakdown

The average cost per milligram of CBD goes down as you spend more money. CBD products under $50 have an average cost per milligram of about 11 cents, products retailing between $50 and $100 dollars are about 10 cents per milligram of CBD, and products over $100 average 8.4 cents per milligram of CBD. Consumers that spend more upfront for CBD products over $100 save over 22% on the cost per milligram of CBD when compared to CBD products under $50.

The majority of CBD product under $50 are between 4 cents and 13 cents per milligram of CBD.

Most CBD products between $50 to $100 dollars are between 3 cents and 12 cents per milligram of CBD.

The largest group of CBD products over $100 were between 3 cents and 9 cents per milligram of CBD. However, 65 of the products over $100 were above 9 cents per milligram. One CBD product that cost $200 was 40 cents per milligram of CBD. Higher retail prices don’t always equal a better deal.


Retail Price vs. Cost per mg of CBD

The bulk of CBD products are under 20 cents per milligram of CBD. However, 31 products out of 856 CBD oils were over 20 cents per milligram of CBD. 10 products are over 40 cents per milligram of CBD.


CBD Examine Value Scores

The average cost of CBD has dropped 37.5% in the last year, from 16 cents per milligram in 2019 to 10 cents per milligram in 2020.

The average cost per milligram of CBD has come down from $0.160 to $0.099 from 2019 to 2020.

We’re updating our “Value Score” on CBD Examine due to the significant price reduction in CBD products.

In 2019, 75% of CBD products that we surveyed were under 21 cents per milligram. In 2020, 75% of products were under about 12 cents per milligram. CBD prices are significantly cheaper. However, our sample size was smaller in 2019 and the price per milligram was based on our lab tests. It’s critical to note that our 2020 CBD price analysis is based on manufacturer claims and many CBD products are inaccurately labeled. Our 2019 industry report found that the majority of mislabeled products came with a “third-party” lab report from the manufacturer.

CBD Examine sends products to independent labs for blind testing because the lab reports provided by CBD companies are unreliable. Some of the cheapest CBD products we’ve lab tested at CBD Examine have contained little-to-no CBD. The reliability and quality of a CBD company are far more important than the retail price tag of a CBD product. Price is only one factor to consider when buying CBD products.


Brand Lookup

The table below contains all the data points used in this price analysis. To see how your favorite brand compares to the market trends, search for the brand name in the table below. The search field below is case sensitive, so remember to capitalize the first letter of the brand you’re looking for.

 

See our picks for the best CBD oils based on our independent lab tests.

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